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asheville gluten free foods

What Are: Celiac Disease, Gluten Intolerance, Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity and Wheat Allergy?

Gluten intolerance is a term used to refer to an entire category of gluten issues:

Celiac disease is an inherited autoimmune disorder that affects the digestive process of the small intestine.

Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (aka: gluten intolerance) causes the body to mount a stress response (often GI symptoms) different from the immunological response that occurs in those who have celiac disease (which most often causes intestinal tissue damage).

A wheat allergy causes the immune system to respond to a food protein because it considers it dangerous to the body when it actually isn’t. This immune response is often time-limited and does not cause lasting harm to body tissues.

We carry a variety of gluten-free products from local and national sources to include:

How much exposure to gluten does it take for DGP to become elevated and how long before it will return to normal?

There is no general rule that applies to all, but we learn from each patient. That said, typically DGP are more sensitive to gluten than tTG, so they become elevated before tTG and disappear sooner than tTG once on a gluten-free diet.

 

What common nutrient deficiencies might an adult experience prior to diagnosis?

Iron, calcium and Vitamin D are the most common deficiencies, but some present with deficiencies in B12, copper, folate, magnesium, niacin, riboflavin and/or zinc.

Nutrient deficiencies associated with celiac disease are due to intestinal damage caused by protein in wheat, rye and barley. In most cases, nutrient deficiencies that were caused by damage from celiac disease will naturally resolve as your intestine heals.

Many gluten-free dieters choose foods that aren’t fortified with vitamins and minerals like their gluten-containing counterparts. Thus, we suggest a general multivitamin to prevent against nutritional deficiencies.

Gluten-free diet: What’s allowed, what’s not

By Mayo Clinic Staff

A gluten-free diet is a diet that excludes the protein gluten. Gluten is found in grains such as wheat, barley, rye and triticale (a cross between wheat and rye).

A gluten-free diet is used to treat celiac disease. Gluten causes inflammation in the small intestines of people with celiac disease. Eating a gluten-free diet helps people with celiac disease control their signs and symptoms and prevent complications.

Initially, following a gluten-free diet may be frustrating. But with time, patience and creativity, you’ll find there are many foods that you already eat that are gluten-free and you will find substitutes for gluten-containing foods that you can enjoy.

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Gluten-free doesn’t mean guilt-free

Simply cutting gluten, a protein found in grains such as wheat, rye and barley, doesn’t lead to automatic weight loss. Many of the products that are gluten-free have more calories in them. (In theory, potato chips are gluten-free but are still a terrible snack.)

“In some cases, the gluten-free has more calories because you are adding more sugar,” says Bonci.

If people substitute something like potato starch or tapioca instead flour, they might be eating more calories, not less.

“It won’t translate to weight loss,” says Bonci.

Some people believe that gluten-free equals healthy, and binge on too many quinoa chips or gluten-free ice cream.

“Looking for gluten-free substitutes [for] desserts and cakes and breads and not eating fruits and vegetables does not make you a healthier eater,” says Madelyn Fernstrom, TODAY’s health and diet editor. “Gluten-free does not mean healthier or a better choice.”

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Is it Gluten Free?

YES

Foods made from grains (and grain-like plants) that do notcontain harmful gluten, including: Corn in all forms (corn flour, corn meal, grits,etc.). Rice in all forms (white, brown, basmati and enriched rice). Also amaranth, buckwheat (kasha), Montina, millet, quinoa, teff, sorghum and soy.

The following ingredients:
Annatto, glucose syrup, lecithin, maltodextrin (even when it is made from wheat), oat gum, plain spices, silicon dioxide, starch, food starch and vinegar (only malt vinegar might contain gluten). Also citric, lactic and malic acids as well as sucrose, dextrose and lactose; and these baking products: arrowroot, cornstarch, guar and xanthan gums, tapioca flour or starch, potato starch flour and potato starch, vanilla.

The following foods:
Milk, butter, margarine, real cheese, plain yogurt and vegetable oils including canola. Plain fruits, vegetables, (fresh, frozen and canned), meat, seafood, eggs, nuts, beans and legumes and flours made from them.

Distilled vinegar is gluten free. (See malt vinegar under NO below).

Distilled alcoholic beverages are gluten free because distillation effectively removes gluten from wheat. They are not gluten free if gluten-containing ingredients are added after distillation, but this rarely, if ever, happens.

Mono and diglycerides are fats and are gluten free.

Spices are gluten free. If there is no ingredient list on the container, it contains only the pure spice noted on the label.

Click Here to Learn the “No’s and Maybe’s”